gluten-free cast iron skillet pizza

So folks. Listen up. For those of you who have an issue with gluten, this one’s for you. This is soooo easy to make at home. And soooo good.  I am grateful to Sarena Shasteen over at Bob’s Red Mill for coming up with this recipe for gluten-free pizza crust.

gluten-free cast-iron skillet pizzagluten-free cast-iron skillet pizzagluten-free cast-iron skillet pizza

The dough can be mixed by hand or you can use the dough hook with your stand up mixer. I’ve tried both methods and to be honest …there’s really no need to pull out your mixer. This is super easy to mix by hand. And less clean-up is always a good thing, right?

I followed Sarena’s list of ingredients with just one exception …I had to switch out one of the flours for what was available at my local market. For this presentation, I decided to enhance the texture by baking it in my cast iron skillet. Such a good move. The heat of the cast iron added an extra crunch to the crust.

gluten-free cast-iron skillet pizzagluten-free cast-iron skillet pizza

Use the skillet of your choice, depending on how thick you like your crust. I used my 12-inch skillet, which measures about 10 1/2-inches at the bottom. The dough is so easy to smooth out, especially when you can use the shape of your skillet to form the crust. Just be sure to have a small bowl of water handy, so that you can keep your hands wet while you spread the dough to the edges. Using the tines of a fork, poke some holes here and there to prevent the dough from puffing too much during baking. The skillet is then placed in a hot oven to partially bake the crust. Once the crust is parbaked, the toppings are added for the final bake.

gluten-free cast-iron skillet pizzagluten-free cast-iron skillet pizza

Add the toppings of your choice. We like to use our favorite marinara sauce along with torn fresh mozzarella and sauteed sliced portabella mushrooms.

gluten-free cast-iron skillet pizzagluten-free cast-iron skillet pizza

Once the pizza comes out of the oven, wait a minute or two then carefully lift it out of the skillet with the parchment paper. Place it on a cutting board, parchment paper included. Top it off with fresh basil, cut it into wedges and enjoy!

gluten-free cast-iron skillet pizzagluten-free cast-iron skillet pizzagluten-free cast-iron skillet pizza

gluten-free cast-iron skillet pizza
5 from 2 votes
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gluten-free cast iron skillet pizza

Adapted from Sarena Shasteen at Bob's Red Mill

Delicious gluten-free crust with a crispy exterior.

Servings 2 10" pizza crusts
Author Rosemary Stelmach

Ingredients

  • 1 cup stone ground white rice flour (165 grams)
  • 1/2 cup potato starch (78 grams)
  • 1/4 cup cornstarch (32 grams)
  • 1/4 cup garbanzo & fava flour or garbanzo bean flour (32 grams)
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 tablespoon instant yeast
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons xanthan gum
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1/2 cup water (plus more if necessary)

Instructions

  1. In a large mixing bowl, combine the rice flour, potato starch, cornstarch, garbanzo & fava flour, sugar, yeast, baking powder, xanthan gum and salt. With a whisk, mix until well combined.
  2. Heat your water to warm (not too hot ...you should be able to put your finger in it without feeling uncomfortable).

  3. In a small bowl, combine the olive oil, apple cider vinegar, eggs and ½ cup warm water.  Add to the dry ingredients and mix well. This can be done by hand or in a stand-up mixer with the dough hook attachment. The dough should be slightly wet.  You should be able to touch it with a wet finger and it should not stick to you.  If it’s too dry, add a little more warm water.

  4. Cover the dough and put it in a warm draft-free place, allowing it to rise for 30 minutes or up to an hour. You can even use it after letting it rest for 15 minutes.

  5. Preheat the oven to 425°F.

  6. Line a 10 or 12-inch cast iron skillet with parchment paper, scoop half of the dough into the skillet.  With wet hands, flatten and shape the dough to fill the bottom of the skillet.  Using the tines of a fork, poke some holes here and there to prevent the dough from puffing too much during baking.

  7. Bake for 5-7 minutes.  It should be set, but not really browned. Remove from oven.  

  8. Top with your favorite sauce, cheese and toppings.  Return to oven for an additional 15-20 minutes or until the crust is golden and the cheese is melted.

  9. Once the pizza comes out of the oven, wait a minute or two then carefully lift it out of the skillet with the parchment paper.   Place it on a cutting board, parchment paper included.  Top it off with fresh basil, cut it into wedges and enjoy!

Recipe Notes

Crusts can be par-baked, cooled and wrapped tightly, then placed in the freezer for future last-minute pizzas.

gluten-free cast-iron skillet pizza

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  • Is there a substitution for the garbanzo flour. I don’t use it and really don’t want to buy a whole bag for a 1/4 cup
    Thanks

    • Hi Sandy. I’m not sure how it would affect the outcome but I suppose you could try substituting with the same amount of GF All-Purpose Flour. But …if you do decide to go with the garbanzo flour, there’s another recipe on my site that you may want to try. Gluten-Free Crispy Vegetable Pakoras. So totally delicious and the batter is made with primarily garbanzo flour! My family goes crazy over these fried veggies. And I’ve even tried using that batter to coat chicken strips as well as shrimp. So good.

  • 5 stars
    I had my doubts. The crust wasn’t rising like I thought it should. I ended up patting it out into the pan (small heavy weight oblong) and let it set a little longer, covered in plastic wrap. I loaded it up with sauce, two layers of pepperoni, cheese & veggies. I ended up with nice caramelized edges and a nice crust that made a satisfying crunch as I cut into it. Best pizza I’ve had in a long time! I would make this again. I used Bob’s Red Mill One to One flour.

    • Yes!!! That’s how these gluten-free breads and crusts are. As you’re working with the dough, it doesn’t seem as though it’ll be so good. But when you end up with that satisfying crunch and full flavor, you know you have a winner! So glad you loved it!!