ina garten’s deep dish apple pie

What we have here is good old-fashioned apple pie. Not your average apple pie. This one isn’t loaded with the flavor of cinnamon. Of course, there’s a bit of cinnamon in the mix along with nutmeg and allspice. The difference here is the surprising hint of citrus. Yes, citrus! It is refreshing and so well-paired with the apples. Who knew?

The original recipe comes from Ina Garten’s cookbook, Barefoot Contessa Family Style. I followed Ina’s directions just about literally for the pie filling …didn’t want to mess with her success. But I did simplify it a bit by using prepared refrigerated pie crusts. It’s a wonderful time-saver but that wasn’t my only motivation. My flour supply is on the low side and with the current limited offerings at the food stores, I decided to hold onto what I had on hand. I’ll be sure to include Ina’s recipe for her Perfect Pie Crust so you’ll have it. As always, you can make it your way.

ina garten's deep dish apple pie

Whether using prepared pie crust or making your own, start your process with that crust. If using the pre-made crust, it is best to work with it when it reaches room temperature. Also, keep in mind that you’ll need to use a deeper than normal pie plate; the one pictured here is a 9” pie pan that measures 10 3/4” across the top and is about 2 1/2” deep. Therefore, the round of pie dough that will be used for the base must be rolled out to be slightly larger than normal. Make certain that it will line the plate and cover the sides with enough to meet or slightly extend over the rim. The goal is to have enough dough all around so that the second layer can be tucked under that edge and sealed all the way around.

If you are gluten intolerant, use your favorite gluten-free pie crust and switch out the small amount of flour in the recipe with gluten-free all-purpose flour.

Alternatively, if making the Perfect Pie Crust …keep in mind that will need a period of 30-minutes in the fridge before rolling it out. Once you have the crust underway, the apples can be prepared for the filling.

ina garten's deep dish apple pieina garten's deep dish apple pieina garten's deep dish apple pieina garten's deep dish apple pie

The apples are peeled, cored and sliced. I usually use my melon baller to scoop out the core of each apple.

ina garten's deep dish apple pie

The orange and lemon zest that is added to the filling totally shines through. You’ll be using a limited amount of sugar so that the overall flavor of this pie is refreshing and not-too-sweet. It actually tastes like it’s healthy. Well it is loaded with fruit, after all.

ina garten's deep dish apple pieina garten's deep dish appleina garten's deep dish apple pieina garten's deep dish apple pie

Once the apple mixture is well incorporated, pile it all in the prepared pie plate. It will make quite a large mound …this is why you can’t use a regular pie plate on this.

After brushing the edge of the bottom crust with egg wash, the second crust is added. Make certain that it is large enough so that the edges fall about 1-inch over the rim, all the way around. That way, you have enough crust to tuck under the edge of the bottom crust. The egg wash that you previously applied will help to seal the edge as you crimp it together with your fingers.

ina garten's deep dish apple pieina garten's deep dish apple pieina garten's deep dish apple pieina garten's deep dish apple pie

The egg wash is then brushed over the entire surface of the crust, then that teaspoon of sugar that you have set aside is sprinkled evenly over that. Don’t forget to cut those slits here and there to allow the steam to escape while baking.

ina garten's deep dish apple pieina garten's deep dish apple pie

Here’s an important step …always place the pie plate on a large sheet pan for its time in the oven. Sometimes, the juices can bubble up and spill over so you want to catch them. I take it a step further by covering the pan with foil. It makes clean-up a breeze.

ina garten's deep dish apple pie

Keep an eye on things as your pie bakes. The edges can brown quickly …well before the pie is done. When you notice that happening, take strips of foil and gently wrap the edge all the way around.  In my oven, that happens about halfway through the process. Then for the final minutes of baking, check on the browning of the entire crust. Once it gets to the darkness that you like, cover the whole thing with a tent of foil. You’ll then end up with the perfect rustic look and texture.

ina garten's deep dish apple pieina garten's deep dish apple pie

This is delicious served warm or chilled. If enjoying it while still warm, the filling can be a bit messy with all of the wonderful juices. But oh so good. Once chilled, the filling tends to firm up substantially. 

ina garten's deep dish apple pieina garten's deep dish apple pie

Of course, you can’t go wrong with a topping of whipped cream. Or a solid scoop of vanilla ice cream. Just a thought.

ina garten's deep dish apple pie

ina garten's deep dish apple pie
5 from 4 votes
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ina garten's deep dish apple pie

Based on a recipe by Ina Garten, found in Barefoot Contessa Family Style

For a time-saver, use pre-made refrigerated pie crust.

Servings 8 servings
Author Rosemary Stelmach

Ingredients

PERFECT PIE CRUST (Makes two 10-inch Crusts)

  • 12 tablespoons unsalted butter, very cold (1 1/2 sticks)
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon granulated sugar
  • 1/3 cup vegetable shortening, very cold
  • 6 to 8 tablespoons ice water (about 1/2 cup)

DEEP DISH APPLE PIE

  • 4 pounds Granny Smith apples, peeled, quartered & cored
  • zest of 1 lemon
  • zest of 1 orange
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed orange juice
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar (plus 1 teaspoon to sprinkle on top)
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
  • Perfect Pie Crust or one (15-ounce) package refrigerated pie dough (such as Pillsbury) at room temperature
  • 1 egg beaten with 1 tablespoon water, for egg wash

Instructions

PERFECT PIE CRUST

  1. Dice the butter and return it to the refrigerator while you prepare the flour mixture. Place the flour, salt, and sugar in the bowl of a food processor fitted with a steel blade and pulse a few times to mix. Add the butter and shortening. Pulse 8 to 12 times, until the butter is the size of peas. With the machine running, pour the ice water down the feed tube and pulse the machine until the dough begins to form a ball.

  2. Dump out on a floured board and roll into a ball. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

DEEP DISH APPLE PIE

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F.

  2. Slice each apple quarter in thirds lengthwise and combine in a bowl with the zests, juices, sugar, flour, salt, cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice.

  3. If using PERFECT PIE CRUST: Cut the dough in half. Roll each piece on a well-floured board into a circle, rolling from the center to the edge, turning and flouring the dough to make sure it doesn’t stick to the board. Fold the dough in half, place in the pie pan, and unfold it to fit the pan. Drape it over the pie pan to extend about 1/2 inch over the rim. Don’t stretch the dough; if it’s too small, just put it back on the board and re-roll it.

    When ready, repeat the process with the top crust.

  4. If using REFRIGERATED PREPARED PIE DOUGH: The round of pie dough that will be used for the base must be rolled out to be slightly larger than normal. Make certain that it will line the plate and cover the sides with enough to meet or slightly extend over the rim. The goal is to have enough dough all around so that the second layer can be tucked under that edge and sealed all the way around.

    When ready, repeat the process with the top crust.

  5. Fill the pie with the apple mixture. Brush the edge of the bottom pie crust with the egg wash so the top crust will adhere. Top with the second crust and, if necessary, trim the edges to about 1 inch over the rim. Tuck the edge of the top crust under the edge of the bottom crust and crimp the two together with your fingers or a fork.

  6. Brush the entire top crust with the egg wash, sprinkle with 1 teaspoon sugar, and cut four or five slits.

  7. Place the pie on a sheet pan and bake for 1 to 1-1/4 hours, or until the crust is browned and the juices begin to bubble out. (See Recipe Notes)

  8. Delicious served warm or chilled.

Recipe Notes

 

Helpful Hint - As the pie is baking, the edges can brown quickly ...well before the pie is done. If you notice that happening, take strips of foil and gently wrap the edge all the way around.  During the final minutes of baking, check on the browning of the entire crust. Once it gets to the darkness that you like, cover the whole thing with a loose tent of foil. You’ll then end up with the perfect rustic look and texture.

ina garten's deep dish apple pie

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